Petr Bambasek

Marketing Strategist. Brand Planner. Leads Business Development at Scanalytics Inc. Into tech, creativity and innovation. Likes to fly, wakeboard and enjoy life. 

You Are Not Late — The Message — Medium »

Can you imagine how awesome it would have been to be an entrepreneur in 1985 when almost any dot com name you wanted was available? All words; short ones, cool ones. All you had to do was ask. It didn’t even cost anything to claim. This grand opportunity was true for years.

Useful Science »

People with depression have higher levels of cytokines (pro-inflammatory secretions) in their bloodstream. Useful 1 People who disclosed more personal information to others tended to be more liked than people who disclosed less personal information. Useful 13 About 3.

3 Years since the Death of Steve Jobs

This Sunday marks three years since the death of Apple co-founder and former CEO, Steve Jobs, at the age of 55. On Friday, Tim Cook sent out a note to Apple employees, sharing some of his thoughts on Jobs’ legacy: 

Team,

Sunday will mark the third anniversary of Steve’s passing. I’m sure that many of you will be thinking of him on that day, as I know I will.

I hope you’ll take a moment to appreciate the many ways Steve made our world better. Children learn in new ways thanks to the products he dreamed up. The most creative people on earth use them to compose symphonies and pop songs, and write everything from novels to poetry to text messages. Steve’s life’s work produced the canvas on which artists now create masterpieces.

Steve’s vision extended far beyond the years he was alive, and the values on which he built Apple will always be with us. Many of the ideas and projects we’re working on today got started after he died, but his influence on them — and on all of us — is unmistakeable.

Enjoy your weekend, and thanks for helping carry Steve’s legacy into the future.

Tim

Source: Cult of Mac

A Rare Look at Design Genius Jony Ive »

Hardware Is The New Software | TechCrunch »

Two key takeaways:

  1. Hardware is still hard. But it’s getting easier.
  2. "Hardware 2.0" companies have disrupted our notions about the difference between hardware and software with one seamless user experience. We’ve seen this approach work for Apple. I’m not surprised it’s working for other companies as well.